Jane Daniell - Paintings and Etchings

Jane Daniell - Paintings and Etchings

  1. Did a particular person or event spark your interest in art?
    When I was 14 and bored with painting cabbages and gymshoes in my school's art class the mistress brought in Sibelius's 'Swan of Tuenela'. I had never heard anything so beautiful and evocative. She told us to draw the tree outside the window and my tree really 'grew'. I discovered art as self-expression for the first time.
  2. How long does it usually take you to complete an artwork?
    I like my artwork to take a bit of time. I am not sure why. It is something to do with the optimism I feel at the start of new piece of work versus the finality of a finished piece of work. When I finish something it's as if there's no opportunity to improve unless I do the whole thing again.....(I have to work at being less precious!)
  3. Have any of your artworks ended up in unusual or famous places?
    I was asked to donate a painting the the Orlando Shakespeare Festival and it was sold at auction for £2000. I did not get a penny! However the woman who bought it gave it to her husband and when they separated she took it with her. He emailed me and asked for a replacement which I couldn't give him as it was an original
  4. Who or what has been the most influential factor in your development?
    Alan Cracknell - a fairly well-known illustrator has given me so much encouragement. Theresa Pateman, accomplished printmaker has taught me all about etching. Two wonderful creative people who don't mind sharing their secrets because their work is so superior there's no need to be coy!....I have also been influenced by my childhood reading. I read massively always with an eye for the illustrations that accompanied the stories.
  5. When did you first start?
    I remember when I was six a 'BIG girl' came in to my classroom and was showing us a cardboard cut-out (it may have been of the virgin Mary) she had painted. I was fascinated by the folds of the material on the headress and asked her to tell me how she had done it. I think it was the incentive that I needed to try to portray things more accurately than I had done up till then
  6. Have you ever had an art-related disaster?
    I was framing a picture for the RA Summer Exhibition. It was the day before the hand-in and a Sunday. The frame and glass were lying on the floor and my husband stepped on the glass and broke it. Early next day he went to the glaziers to get a replacement glass. It was much too thick, but after considerable effort I managed to get the mount, print and glass secured in the frame, but on checking the image I discovered the glass was filthy on the inside. Out it all came again...Cleaned it up and put the frame back together. Checked the image and found it smeared with blood....I had cut my finger! No time to cut a new mount, so I turned the blood stained mount around secured it all in the frame again, checked the image and found the blood had somehow worked its way round to the other side! Horror! Out with the putty rubber and scalpel! Needless to say it wasn't accepted.....
  7. What do you like best about being an artist?
    I like being able to make an image where there was a sheet of blank paper....
  8. What do you like least about being an artist?
    Sometimes I think the sheet of blank paper was preferable!
  9. Where do you work, do you have a studio?
    I have a loft where all my paints and artwork are kept. It is also where the guinea pig lives, the spare room, and the dumping ground for all those bits and pieces that need to be dumped.
  10. Are there other artists in your family?
    I met my natural mother about 5 years ago. She is 70 now and has spent her life drawing, painting and embroidering. She ended up being a very successful potter. Amazingly I had no knowledge of her artistic nature and we were both surprised and pleased to find we had this in common. Neither of her two other children have pursued art, and none of my adopted brothers or sister have either....Blood will out as they say!